Tag Archives: greenspace

Summer Work Parties at Crown Hill Glen

Join your neighbors and help keep up Crown Hill Glen this summer. Parties are scheduled from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. on the following Saturdays. Just show up ready to work!

  • Saturday, June 30
  • Saturday, July 28 (stop by during the Crown Hill Neighborhood Garage Sale to help out or check out the park and enjoy some lemonade!)
  • Saturday, August 25

Park volunteers need assistance with trimming overgrown greenery, spreading mulch and pulling weeds and blackberries.

The park is located at NW 89th Street and 19th Avenue NW.

Crown Hill Natural Area gets TLC

It was a wonderful convergence of a beautiful day and a hearty group of volunteers at the Crown Hill Natural Area on December 4.  Fourteen members of the UW National Honor Society came out to refurbish the ADA walkway, clear the trails of debris, cutwork party volunteers from UW back overgrown shrubs, and pick up litter in the natural area at the end of 19th Avenue NW at NW 89th Street.  Joyce Ford and Nancy Gruber have been the stalwart neighbors leading periodic work parties to take care of this little haven for birds, wildlife, and people enjoying a moment with nature.

Joyce Ford
Joyce Ford, one of the primary leaders in caring for this area.

The Crown Hill Natural Area was acquired by Seattle Parks in 1998. For a bit of history of this former Victory Garden, read this article from the Ballard News-Tribune of March 18, 1998.

Crown Hill Park, Skatedot Design Input Opportunity, Aug 2nd, 2010

Seattle Parks and Recreation is seeking your voice on the design of the “Skatedot” at the newly christened Crown Hill Park. The skatedot is a 1500 sq. ft. feature to be located near the Southeast corner of the park. The skatedot will provide a much needed place for beginning to intermediate skateboarders to hone their skills. During the April 28th meeting, the skate feature was discussed in general terms, but specific details were deferred to a later time.

Please come and participate! No need to be a skateboarder or a parent of a skateboarder. This meeting is open to all. Pillar Design Studios, a nationally known skate park design firm, will be be leading this workshop.

Monday, August 2nd
6-8 PM
Crown Hill Center
9250 14th Ave NW

For more information or questions, contact:

Kim Baldwin
Seattle Parks and Recreation
(206) 615-0810
kim.baldwin@seattle.gov

For more information on the new Crown Hill Park, please see: http://seattle.gov/parks/projects/crown_hill

And the Name of the New Park on Crown Hill is ….

“Crown Hill Park”

From the Seattle Parks and Recreation Press Release:

Seattle Parks and Recreation Acting Superintendent Christopher Williams has named two new parks in the Ballard area, and re-named a playfield in West Seattle.

Crown Hill Park

This park, located at Holman Road NW and 13th Avenue NW, will include ballfield renovations, walkways, entries, open space, areas for play, seating, and plantings. It is located on property recently purchased from the Seattle Public Schools.

Parks originally worked on developing the property into a park through the 2000 Pro Parks Levy, but the project was put on hold in 2006 after Seattle Public Schools declared the Crown Hill School and adjacent land a surplus, and put it up for sale. The City of Seattle purchased the property in March 2009 for $5.4 million. The project is now getting underway again.

This 1.71-acre acquisition fulfills one of Crown Hill’s longstanding community goals in its neighborhood plan.  The 2008 Parks and Green Spaces Levy development funding of $1.2 million will contribute to completing the design and construction of the park.  Construction is projected for spring 2011, with an anticipated completion in the fall of 2011.

For more information on the park development, visit the website at: http://www.seattle.gov/parks/projects/crown_hill/

In the same press release, it was revealed the other new park in Ballard (former site of the Church of Seventh Elect in Spiritual Israel, 7028 9th Ave NW) has been designated “Kirke,” which means “Church” in Norwegian.

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From Legends to Lights: The Story of Olympic Golf Club

By Heidi Madden

On the crisp, clear afternoon of December 7, 1924, ships passing through Puget Sound on their way to Elliott Bay were treated to a surprise:  On a ridge high above the Sound, just north of Seattle, a new 600-square-foot American flag had been hoisted.  The impressive symbol, meant to be the “first sight of Seattle” for ships bound for Elliott Bay, marked the official opening of the new Olympic Golf and County Club.

Olympic Golf Course 1925
Golfers at Olympic Golf Course circa 1925 (click to enlarge) -- PEMCO Webster & Stevens Collection, MOHAI

Golf Club Manager Douglas McLeod McMillin and Club President William M. Bolcom had the honor of hoisting the flag for the first time to the top of its 118-foot pole next to the new club house located at about 20th Ave. NW and NW 89th Street.  The flag’s inauguration took place in front of about a hundred spectators, many of whom were visiting the new golf course for the first time.

Work on the new course began in May of 1924 on the picturesque site.  Architect Francis James actively oversaw the work, and while Bolcom was publicly dedicated to opening the course to golfers in late fall, James was less convinced that the deadline could be met.  But in late October of 1924, the new course was unofficially opened to the public – ahead of schedule.

The 18-hole course, at the time just north of the Seattle city limits, was an L-shaped property that stretched east to west from 15th Ave. NW to 24th Ave. NW.  Its longest north-to-south line was on its west side, where it stretched from NW 95th Street to NW 85th Street.

Olympic Golf Course circa 1936
Olympic Golf Course circa 1936 (click to enlarge)

Bing’s Favorite Swing

The course was designed to challenge seasoned golfers, and it attracted many legends and pioneers of the sport:  Tommy Armour, aka “The Silver Scot,” winner of the 1927 U.S. Open and the 1931 British Open; Macdonald “Mac” Smith, whose full-swing technique Bing Crosby admired; Johnny Farrell, winner of the 1928 U.S. Open; and Horton Smith, who in 1934 was the first winner of the new Augusta National Invitation Tournament, later named The Masters Tournament.

Perhaps the club’s most notable visitor was the charismatic and impeccably dressed Walter “The Haig” Hagen, five-time PGA Championship winner who, in 1922, was the first native-born American to win the British open.  But more important to some local fans, in 1929 Hagen broke the Olympic Golf Club mark by scoring a 68 while paired with Horton Smith in an exhibition match against the club professional and an ace amateur.

Guns and Roses

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Earth Day 2010 in Crown Hill

Crown Hill neighbors are urged to join the Earth Day event on April 17 in our neighborhood. Carkeek Park is setting up teams that will fan out on our streets surrounding the park and do three things: (1) stencil on storm drains the caution about dumping waste, (2) distribute one-page flyers to homes regarding pet waste, and (3) pick up trash along roadways and in public spaces.

What’s up with stenciling drains? There are over 100 storm drains in the Piper’s Creek watershed that send stormwater through the Park and into Puget Sound. Runoff from roads and gutters contributes lots of gunk to Puget Sound every year. Studies show that marking storm drains with the message “Dump No Waste, Drains to Stream” doubles community awareness.

Come to the Park’s Environmental Education Center at 8:30 a.m. to get matched up with a 3-5 person team, pick up supplies, and get your assignment of streets to cover. Just a few hours of work, then an Earth Day celebration with pizza at noon.  Bring work gloves and remember to dress for all sorts of weather.

It is helpful if you register in advance by calling 386-9154 to help Park staff figure appropriate numbers of stencils, trash bags, etc.

Holman/15th Median Study Review

15th Near 85th Artists Concept
15th Near 85th Artists Concept

Thanks to everyone who filled out a survey questionnaire to help gauge community and business support for a vegetated median along portions of 15th Ave NW (from 83rd St to 87th St) and Holman Road (from 87th St to 12th Ave).  The Holman Road / 15th Ave corridor is a dominant feature in our community, and improvements to the corridor have the potential to make our neighborhood safer for both drivers and pedestrians, healthier for businesses, nicer looking and greener.

Holman / 15th Median Study Community Review Meeting
December 10, 2009 at 7:00pm, doors open at 6:30
Journey Church , 9204 11th Ave NW
Snacks provided

On Thursday, December 10 at 7:00pm the Crown Hill Neighborhood Association and the Crown Hill Business Association will host a community meeting to review designs for a series of planted medians for a section of the Holman Road / 15th Ave NW corridor.  Produced by a team of students from the University of Washington’s Community, Environment, and Planning Program, these designs reflect the responses from more than 290 Crown Hill residents through an online survey, as well as conversations with SDOT, Metro transit officials, and business owners along the corridor.

The student team will present a preliminary conceptual drawing (see draft below) and discuss several options for your comment.  Feedback from this meeting will be used to produce their final design recommendations.

Preliminary Median Concept Schematic
Preliminary Median Concept Schematic

Holman Road Median Study Meeting

December 10, 2009 at 7:00pm
Journey Church , 9204 11th Ave NW

On Thursday, December 10 at 7:00pm the Crown Hill Neighborhood Association and the Crown Hill Business Association will host a community meeting to review designs for a series of planted medians for a section of the Holman Road / 15th Ave NW corridor.  Produced by a team of students from the University of Washington’s Community, Environment, and Planning Program, these designs reflect the feedback received from over 290 Crown Hill residents through an online survey, as well as conversations with SDOT, Metro transit officials, and business owners along the corridor.

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