Tag Archives: public transit

Transit Survey

bdc

King County Metro Transit made big changes to many of its bus routes on September 29th, 2012. They made these changes after much public consultation. Most changes to routes and schedules were a response to the introduction of the Rapid Ride C and D lines providing service from West Seattle to Downtown Seattle, and Ballard to Downtown Seattle via Queen Anne. This is a Ballard District Council led initiative to determine whether these changes have made it easier or harder to use public transit. Some people feel their commute or other use of the bus system has been impaired, while others feel the changes have been an improvement. This is not designed as a scientific survey, but an opportunity to see whether or not the service is improved over what it was.

Participation in this survey is completely voluntary. The information collected will be tabulated and used for transit planning discussions for Ballard and in discussions with Metro Transit. The survey is open until Jan 31, 2013

To add your voice, please visit:

tinyurl.com/BallardTransit

Rapid Ride Line “D” Route Map Updated


View 15/Line D changes in Crown Hill in a larger map

Back in January 2011, we reported the tentative routing for the northern terminus of King County Metro’s new Line “D” service. That routing as well as the routing for the southern terminus has now been finalized. Additionally station and stop information has been added and/or altered. In the map above, the new routing is in red and the current routing (15 and 15X) buses is in blue. The official route map from King County Metro is below.  KC Metro has recently secured federal funding for the “C” line. The “D” line has not yet been funded by the Federal Transit Administration. The D line is presently proposed to be up and running in late 2012. More information on the D line is available here.  Metro also has a Rapid Ride Blog which is updated from time to time.

Rapid Ride Line D routing and stops
Rapid Ride Line D routing and stops (click to download PDF from Metro)

 

Seattle Transportation Public Input Wanted

The Seattle Citizens Transportation Advisory Committee III (CTAC III) is seeking public input. CTAC III was established by City Council Resolution 31240. The Mayor’s office appointed a 14 member committee this winter. The committee has been charged with setting priorities for the Seattle Dept of Transportation (SDOT) and recommending funding sources. They held 6 meetings in April and early May to consider the following issues: 1) Business/Freight; 2) Social Justice (South); 3) Neighborhood Interests; 4) Social Justice (North); 5) Environmental; 6) Public Health/Disabilities.  Now it’s your turn to provide input. CTAC III will conduct three public input workshops to gather general public opinion:

Sector Date/Time Location
South May 23
5:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Southwest Library
Meeting Room
9010 35th Avenue S.W.
Seattle, WA
North May 24
5:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Fremont Library
Meeting Room
731 N. 35th Street
Seattle, WA
Central May 26
5:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Washington Middle School Cafeteria
2101 S Jackson Street
Seattle, WA

If you are unable to attend one of these public input sessions, you can still provide your input via an online survey available here.

Walk Score® Now Includes Transit Score

A couple of years ago, we wrote an article on Walk Score® from walkscore.com.  The Walk Score® for an address is a measure of the walkability for that address, in other words how easy it is to walk to most destinations such as grocery stores, libraries, bookstores, etc. Scores at the high end (90-100) indicate an environment where “Daily errands do not require a car.” Scores at the low end (0-24) mean “Almost all errands require a car.”

The programmers at Walk Score® have recently implemented a similar index:  Transit Score(tm) to indicate the transit friendliness of an address.

Try it yourself!
Go to WalkScore.com, enter your address, and see how you fare on these two measures of reduced automobile dependence.
walkscore
Scores for 9250 14th Ave NW (click for full size)

Continue reading

SDOT proposes changes to 7th Ave NW and NW 100th Street

Many of you have received a postcard in the mail announcing proposed changes to 7th Ave NW and NW 100th Street near the QFC Shopping Center. These changes are proposed to facilitate the new routing of the Rapid Ride Line “D” which we covered earlier.

The Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT) is proposing changes to 7th Avenue NW (between NW 100th Street and NW Holman Rd). The proposed changes include the following:

  • Convert 7th Ave NW to one-way northbound between NW 100th Street and NW Holman Road
  • Install curb, gutter and sidewalk on west side of 7th Avenue NW
  • Install curb, gutter and sidewalk on south side of NW 100th Street (between NW 100th Place and 7th Ave NW)
  • No parking on west side of 7th Avenue NW and south side of NW 100th Street

proposed

The proposed improvements are designed to support King County Metro’s Ballard RapidRide service which is scheduled to begin in fall 2012. Converting 7th Avenue NW to one-way will improve access to the RapidRide terminal.

Your comments on the proposed revisions would be appreciated.

Please contact Jonathan Dong with comments:
(206) 233-8564
jonathan.dong@seattle.gov

Rapid Ride Line D is coming

King County Metro will be replacing the current 15 and 15 Express buses which serve Crown Hill with Rapid Ride D Line by the end of 2012. As shown on KC Metro’s graphic (at the end of this article), both the Northern and Southern end of the line details have yet to be firmed up (see below for proposed route). Rapid Ride Line D will serve the route between Crown Hill and Downtown Seattle via Queen Anne.

General information on Rapid Ride is available from Metro’s Rapid Ride web page. Rapid Ride offers many improvements over the current bus service. Some of the improvements include:

  • Faster boarding via three doors rather than the current single point of entry
  • You won’t need a timetable. Service as frequent as every 10 minutes during the commute periods and into a larger portion of the non-commute day. 15 minute interval at other times during the day, and the same interval as the 15 for the wee morning and late evening hours
  • Pre-paid boarding. Pay at the kiosk, and walk on.
  • Fewer stops speed transit up with the tradeoff of having to walk a little more
  • Improved amenities at stops, including improved lighting, and stop request signals to notify bus drivers of waiting riders

Of interest to many in Crown Hill, Blueridge and Olympic Manor will be how the bus is routed on the northern terminus. The current routing of the 15 turns around using a loop comprised of the residential streets 14th Ave NW, NW 105th St, 13th Ave NW, NW 103rd St, and 14th Ave NW.  According to Paul Roybal of Metro, Line D is proposed to use a loop comprised of Holman Rd, 7th Ave NW, NW 100th, 100th Place, 3rd Ave NW, and Holman Road. Stops have not been determined, as yet. This will be music to the ears of many living on the current terminal loop, as articulated buses will no longer be driving on the residential streets adjacent to their homes at all hours. However that also means a longer walk to reach the new bus from many areas in Crown Hill, Blueridge and parts of Olympic Manor. Additionally, this will force a pedestrian crossing of Holman Road for those riders residing North and South of Holman to either board or alight from the bus. The changes will mean easier connections to the 75, 28 and 5 routes running respectively along Holman, 3rd and 8th Aves, and Greenwood Avenue.


View 15/Line D changes in Crown Hill in a larger map

Below is the full route map published by Metro. This is available as a PDF from the Line D information page at Metro.

Continue reading

Walk Bike Ride

WBR Logo

Walk Bike Ride is a Seattle initiative to:

  • Create an equitable transportation system for all by providing more affordable travel choices
  • Focus on the places where people want to be and add qualities that make them want to stay
  • Prioritize right-of-way space to emphasize walking, biking and riding

The initiative emphasizes the transportation choices we make each day and encourages us to walk, bike, take public transit more often to: 1) save money; 2) improve our health; 3) improve the health of our communities.

The city wants your input and has scheduled a series of meetings:

Continue reading